Landscape Design at SF Decorator Showcase: Webster/Hopkins

gallery retreat Another adventure to the San Francisco Decorator Showcase led me to stumble across the amazing and unique landscape design creation of Katharine Webster and partner-in-crime architect Thayer Hopkins. With an undeveloped outdoor space begging to be transformed, Webster and Hopkins took a former doghouse and turned it into an unforgettable "Gallery Retreat." According to John Tiffany, Gallery Retreat is a "sequence of spatial and tactile experiences," and I couldn't agree more. As I ventured through the retreat into "Reflect," the concept of landscape design had completely outdone its formal boundaries and brought indoor and outdoor design together in a seamless flow of art, function and relaxation.

gallery retreat webster hopkins

Webster and Hopkins' experience from Gallery Retreat into Reflect is all about the subtle and the dramatic coming together to create a space that blocks out whatever distractions may be on the outside. In landscape design, this is all you can ask for. 

"In order to realize my vision, if I need a certain table or chair, which has yet to exist on the market, I simply create and produce them," says Webster. "Fulfillment of the creative process is the veranda of freedom."

Pathway gallery retreat

Webster has a Bachelor’s degree in Environmental Sculpture and a Master’s in Landscape Architecture from Harvard. Her East Coast education flourishes in the laid-back and environmental West Coast, as her creation at the San Francisco Decorator Showcase illustrated, and she has truly turned influences and ideas into tangible creations that excel in the art of landscape design. Her partnership with Hopkins reiterates the importance of integrating indoor and outdoor spaces. According to Tiffany, "the team felt that we not only had two distinct, exciting design challenges, but the welcome additional complexity of making their choices and responses feel like an integrated whole."

mirrors

mirror mulch webster hopkins

Photo Credit: Tyler Chartier Photography